Why the future of Russia's most progressive court system is hanging in the balance

In December 2013 the Russian Constitution celebrated its 20th anniversary. However, for lawyers, this anniversary was overshadowed by another event. On 7 October 2013 the President of the Russian Federation submitted to the State Duma (the lower house of the Russian parliament) a bill proposing amendments to the Constitution. Under this bill, it was proposed that Russia's two highest courts, which sit above two separate systems, be merged. A de facto result of this is the dissolution of the most progressive court in Russia: the Supreme Arbitrazh Court (SAC). The bill provides that the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation will become the single highest judicial body for considering civil, criminal, administrative and other cases, as well as economic disputes (the latter were previously within the remit of the SAC). The Supreme Court will be relocated from Moscow to St Petersburg, with a new separate department for economic disputes.

Country’s arbitrazh courts under threat as merger between SAC and Supreme Court gets seal of approval

In December 2013 the Russian Constitution celebrated its 20th anniversary. However, for lawyers, this anniversary was overshadowed by another event. On 7 October 2013 the President of the Russian Federation submitted to the State Duma (the lower house of the Russian parliament) a bill proposing amendments to the Constitution. Under this bill, it was proposed that Russia’s two highest courts, which sit above two separate systems, be merged. A de facto result of this is the dissolution of the most progressive court in Russia: the Supreme Arbitrazh Court (SAC).

This premium content is reserved for
Legal Week Subscribers.

Continue reading by getting
started with a subscription.

Subscribe Now For Unlimited Access

For enterprise-wide or corporate enquires, please contact David Sampson on corpsubslegalweek@alm.com