Same-sex marriage and conventional marriage should have equal legal rights

What exactly is marriage? According to the 1969 Revised Canons Ecclesiastical, the Church of England's definition of marriage is: "A union permanent and life-long; for better for worse; till death them do part; of one man and one woman; to the exclusion of all others on either side; for the procreation and nurture of children; for the hallowing and right direction of the natural instincts and affections; and for the mutual society, help and comfort which the one ought to have of the other, both in prosperity and adversity." But whether conducted at a civil or religious ceremony, marriage is a social contract rather than a religious one. That contract is regulated by the state, not by religious organisations.

UK Government should focus on the social definition of marriage rather than the religious, argues Miles Geffin

What exactly is marriage? According to the 1969 Revised Canons Ecclesiastical, the Church of England’s definition of marriage is: “A union permanent and life-long; for better for worse; till death them do part; of one man and one woman; to the exclusion of all others on either side; for the procreation and nurture of children; for the hallowing and right direction of the natural instincts and affections; and for the mutual society, help and comfort which the one ought to have of the other, both in prosperity and adversity.”

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