Finley Kumble’s children – the familiar cycle of legal collapses

There have been plenty of precedents for high-profile collapses in the world’s largest legal market, but one failure still looms the largest over the US profession 24 years on. After all, the rise and rapid implosion of Finley Kumble Wagner Heine Underberg Manley Myerson & Casey was in some aspects even more startling than that of Dewey & LeBoeuf. Finley was built at breakneck speed on the basis of a new model. In place of the traditional focus on the practise of law, the firm hungered for partners who would win business and expansion through continuous lateral recruitment.

There have been plenty of precedents for high-profile collapses in the world’s largest legal market, but one failure still looms the largest over the US profession 24 years on.

After all, the rise and rapid implosion of Finley Kumble Wagner Heine Underberg Manley Myerson & Casey was in some aspects even more startling than that of Dewey & LeBoeuf. Finley was built at breakneck speed on the basis of a new model. In place of the traditional focus on the practise of law, the firm hungered for partners who would win business and expansion through continuous lateral recruitment.

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