Descending on London - the capital's rise as a forum for international disputes

An increasing number of disputes from emerging markets are arriving at the doors of the English courts, and their complexity and scale is escalating. Herbert Smith's Philip Carrington and Simon Bushell report on the hurdles faced by practitioners

An increasing number of disputes from emerging markets are arriving at the doors of the English courts, and their complexity and scale is escalating. Herbert Smith’s Philip Carrington and Simon Bushell report on the hurdles faced by practitioners

The English High Court and the London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA) have long been favoured by international commercial parties with major disputes. However, the frequency, size and complexity of such disputes is now reaching new heights. The economic and political turbulence in emerging and frontier markets, especially Russia and other members of the CIS, the Middle East and Africa, has been the catalyst for a series of disputes over the past five years or so that place significant – and welcome – demands on the London legal market and its legal infrastructure.

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